Graham's Games
dice table
More about the Dice Table

What makes Dicewords unique amongst word games is that the dice can be identified by their own colour (and special symbol for colour-blind players). This means you can know which letters are on each particular die - and therefore weigh up the chances of getting the letters you want when rerolling.

A strongly competitive Dicewords player will soon get to learn where the letters are. But you don’t need to learn it, because it’s all laid out for you in the Dice Table.

Take a while to look at the table. At first it may seem like a jumble of letters, but it’s really quite ordered. Each line represents a die and so is printed in that die’s colour; the six characters on the line are the contents of the die’s six faces (eg. the Orange can give you J, A, H, M, N or R).

There are two ‘vowel’ dice (Gold and Indigo). Gold also has the wild card/joker, while Indigo includes Y (the semi-vowel). So straight away you know you will get vowels on these two dice most of the time; if the indigo die has given you the Y face and you want more vowels, then roll the Indigo again.

The other seven ‘regular’ dice each contain one vowel too (the second column of the Dice Table), so when you roll all the dice you are likely to get a vowel on at least one of these. Again, the Y is treated like a vowel here - the Brown can’t give you a ‘real’ vowel.

Each of the seven regular dice also has a ‘rare’ letter (the first column of the table). These letters only appear once each in the set, so being on separate dice enables them to be rolled together. The entire first column of the table actually gives the characters used as the small ‘identifiers’ on the dice for colour-blind players (who can think of the purple die as the Q die...etc). These small characters can also be a simple reminder to everybody of where the rare letters are.

The remaining four columns of the regular dice are the other consonants (two of each letter, plus an extra S and T). No two dice in the Dicewords set have more than one letter in common (except the Gold and Indigo, which have all the five vowels in common). And don’t forget you can also use the Letter Distribution Table (on the back of the rule sheet) to check which colours have which letters.


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